HomeSTORIESWorld's largest survey on climate change: Majority call for wide-ranging action

World’s largest survey on climate change: Majority call for wide-ranging action

The United Nations Development Program ‘Peoples’ Vote’ reflects the views of more than half of the world’s population, indicating that 64% of participants believe that climate change is a global emergency.

The United Nations Development Program ‘Peoples’ Clote Vote reflects the views of more than half of the world’s population following the results of a study by Oxford University. According to the survey results, 64 percent of participants believe that climate change is a global emergency.

The findings of the Peoples’ Climate Vote survey affected the results of the world’s largest climate change survey. Covering 50 countries with more than half the world’s population, the study included more than half a million people under the age of 18, which is an important factor in climate change that can currently vote in general elections.

Detailed results divided by age, gender, and education will be shared with governments worldwide by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), which has organized a new survey with the University of Oxford.

In many participating countries, it is the first time that a major public opinion poll has been held on climate change. The year 2021 is an important year for international commitment to climate change, and important discussions will be held at the UN climate summit in November in Glasgow, UK.

In the study, respondents were asked whether climate change is a global emergency and whether they support eighteen climate goals in six areas: economic, energy, transportation, food and farm, environmental and human protection.

World's largest survey on climate change: Majority call for wide-ranging action
World’s largest survey on climate change: Majority call for wide-ranging action

The results show that people tend to seek more comprehensive climate policies beyond the current gaming environment. For example, in eight out of ten countries with high-emission research from the energy sector, large structures have supported renewable energy.

In four out of five countries with high turnout land and adequate data on policy preferences, there has been extensive support for forest and land conservation. Nine out of ten countries with a large urban population support the widespread use of clean electric vehicles and buses or bicycles.

UNDP Director General Achim Steiner said: “Research results clearly show that emergency climate action has widespread support for people around the world, of all races, ages, genders and education. with this problem. “

“From climate-friendly farming to environmental protection and investment in green recovery from Covid-19, this study brings the voice of the people forward to climate change. It shows how countries can move forward with public support as we work together to address this huge challenge,” he added. Steiner.

New research was distributed on mobile game networks to include audiences that are hard to reach by traditional voting, such as teens under 18. Voting experts at Oxford University measure a large sample to represent the age, gender, and educated population profiles of the countries in the study, resulting in a small margin of errors of / – 2 percent.

The policies included broad, popular forest conservation support (54 percent community support), solar energy, wind power and renewable energy (53 percent), use of climate-friendly farming strategies (52 percent) and significant investment in green businesses and jobs. (50 percent).

Professor Stephen Fisher, Department of Sociology, Oxford University, said: “Research – the largest survey ever held on public opinion on climate change – has shown that gaming networks can not only reach more people, but also integrate different types of people into a multinational group. “Peoples’ Climate Vote presented a database of public opinion that we have never seen before. Emergency climate acceptance is much broader than previously thought. We also found that the majority of people obviously want a stronger and more comprehensive response.”

Research shows a direct link between a person’s level of learning and his desire for climate change. There was a high level of respect for climate change among university or college students in all countries, from low-income countries like Bhutan (82 percent) and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (82 percent), to rich countries like France (87 percent) and Japan ( 82 percent).

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