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Can Eating Fast Food Increase Your Stress Levels?

Can Eating Fast Food Increase Your Stress Levels?, read to know more

01/6 Low consumption of fast food associated with low levels of stress: Study

In modern times, whether young or old, stress levels are as pervasive as anything else. Be it a fast-paced lifestyle which is fully work-related problems or personal problems, stress has become a part of everyday life. With little time for cooking or paying attention to the type of food you eat, most people resort to fast food, as it is easily available and also satisfies your taste buds. But does a fast diet play a role in increasing your stress levels? Read on to find out how weird foods and stress levels are linked.

02/6 The link between fast food levels and stress

A study was published in the journal Nutrients that has suggested that mothers with low birth weight babies, after participating in the study, eat less fast food and light fatty foods.

They did not do so because the study’s researchers told them to do so, but because the experimental lifestyle interventions helped reduce their stress.

The 16-week program was also targeted at preventing weight gain by promoting stress management, healthy eating, and also through exercise. The ways to get there were simple steps included in time management and priorities, most of which featured in a series of videos depicting mothers as participants in the study.

Can Eating Fast Food Increase Your Stress Levels?, read to know more
Can Eating Fast Food Increase Your Stress Levels?, read to know more

03/6 The link between fast food levels and stress

A study was also published in the journal Nutrients has suggested that mothers with low birth weight babies, after participating in the study, eat less fast food and light fatty foods.

They did not do so because the study’s researchers told them to do so, but because the experimental lifestyle interventions helped reduce their stress.

It was a 16-week program which was targeted at preventing weight gain by promoting stress management, healthy eating, and exercise. The ways to get there were simple steps included in time management and priorities, most of which featured in a series of videos depicting mothers as participants in the study.

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04/6 Research details

338 participants, obese or overweight mothers between the ages of 18 and 39, are employed in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), which works for the low-income mothers and children up to five years old. Eligible applicants must have an annual household income of not more than 185 percent of the poverty line.

Chang said these women are likely to face many challenges that could put them under pressure: financial hardship, living in degraded areas, frequent travel, unstable romantic relationships and families full of young children. It is also common for this figure to maintain 10 or more pounds of post-natal pregnancy weight and the risk of lifelong obesity and the complications that can occur to them and new babies if they do not become pregnant again.

During the trial, 212 participants in the intervention group watched 10 videos in which women like them gave unwritten evidence on healthy eating and food preparation, stress management, and physical activity. Participants also conducted 10-group telephone conferences during the study.

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05/6 Quotes from the study

Chang and colleagues were also previously reported that as a group, women in the study intervention group were more likely to reduce their fat intake than women in the comparative group who were given print materials for lifestyle changes.

These new analyzes showed that intervention studies alone did not directly affect that change in diet.

When researchers assessed the potential role of stress as a mediator, the indirect effect of the intervention – reducing participants’ apparent stress – was associated with lower consumption of high-fat diets, including fast food. A single point reduction in pressure balancing pressure was linked to a nearly 7 percent reduction in how often women ate a high-fat diet.

The intervention focuses on it by showing examples of women on how to achieve a healthier and less stressful life rather than telling them what to change.

06/6 Conclusion

“I’ve learned a lot from those women. Everything needs to work and work in everyday life – anytime, anywhere,” Chang said.

Other examples: Comparing a bag of chips with a bag of apples – chips can be about half the price, but they provide fewer family meals. Or use a family commitment chart to assign tasks to young children, and encourage mothers to reward children with kisses or individual attention when they follow instructions. And it takes a deep breath to fight the feeling of oppression.

When it comes to stress management, researchers are focused on advising women to change their thinking, and not to blame themselves when things go wrong, rather than to solve the problems that plagued them.

Chang said that they have raised their awareness of the pressures in their lives, unfortunately many of these problems are not in their hands.

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