What is Zoom Bombing and how to avoid it?

Workplaces around the world have taken video conferences like Zoom as their primary means of communicating progressive work amidst the epidemic. However, as helpful as Zoom, video conference tools expose strangers to your Zoom meetings uninvited.

This process is called Zoom bombing and is happening to many users around the world right now. Attackers who blow up a meeting will often show some nudity, pornography, or other disturbing image in order to ruin the meetings. What’s worse is that once the attacker knows his or her way to your Zoom meeting, removing the attacker is not as helpful as anyone can re-enter the Zoom meeting with a different name.

So, if your meeting is bombed, the only way out is to end it and start a new one. However, this difficult process can be completely avoided if you are careful to set simple safety measures to prevent unwanted intrusion into your meetings.

Your Zoom meeting could be the next bombing event if you do not take the necessary precautionary measures to avoid it.

Workplaces around the world have taken video conferences like Zoom as their primary means of communicating progressive work amidst the epidemic. However, as helpful as Zoom, video conference tools expose strangers to your Zoom meetings uninvited.
Workplaces around the world have taken video conferences like Zoom as their primary means of communicating progressive work amidst the epidemic. However, as helpful as Zoom, video conference tools expose strangers to your Zoom meetings uninvited.

How can you avoid getting bombed?

There are a few ways to make it really difficult for an attacker to blast your Zoom session. Here are a few steps you can take.

Generate a random meeting ID

When hosting a public Zoom meeting, avoid using your personal meeting ID. Instead, create a periodically formed assembly D. To do this, return to the Schedule to create a new meeting and once you have set the date and time, proceed to select the “Auto Generate” option on the next screen to provide a random ID number.

Set screen sharing controls

When planning community meetings, it’s a good idea to never lose control of your screen. Limit the power of screen sharing for you alone. You can do this by going further to the hosting controls and clicking on the arrow next to Screen Share. You can find the ‘Who can share?’ Option Under the Advanced Sharing Options tab, find the and set it to ‘Keeper Only’.

Only logged-in users can join

You may choose to allow only those people in your meetings who are logged in to Zoom via their personal / work emails. This does not allow anonymous members (Visitors) to join. In order to set this up you need to go to the Zoom web portal and navigate to Settings. Enable the option saying “Only authorized users can join meetings” listed here.

Set a password

Setting up your Zoom meetings with a password is an easy way to protect and protect uninvited guests. When you set a random Meeting ID as you did above in the first tip, and set a password for it. This way you share your Meeting ID publicly but only send the required password to those users you want in the meeting.

Lock your meeting

Visitors can also lock their Zoom session once all members have arrived. If your meeting is locked, no one is allowed to enter, including those with the meeting ID and the correct password. To lock your meeting, click on the ‘Participants’ tab of the active meeting and in the next pop-up menu, find and click on the ‘Lock Meeting’ option.

About Staff reporter

Check Also

Hipla Technologies surprisingly Joins the Open Security & Safety Alliance

Hipla Technologies announced its induction into the OSSA body to further polish and proliferate its 360° Facility management solutions by leveraging expected collaboration with market leaders in the IoT space - from device manufacturers and software providers to regulatory bodies. The company has enterprise customers in India, Singapore, Philippines, and US.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *